Current Members of the Scientific Advisory Board

Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University) - Probability, Combinatorics, Mathematical Statistics, Theoretical Computer Science, Statistical Physics
Ana Aguilera (University of Granada) - Modelling and forecasting with functional data, Categorical data analysis, Statistical applications in different fields
David Ayala (Montana State University) - Algebraic and Differential Geometry and Topology
Martin Barlow (University of British Columbia) - Probability Theory
Yuri Berest (Cornell University) - Representation Theory and Geometry
Derek Bingham (Simon Fraser University) - Statistics
Steven Boyer (Université du Québec à Montréal) - Fundamental Mathematics & Topology of varieties.
José A. Cañizo (Universidad de Granada) - Partial Differential Equations
Jose Carrillo (University of Oxford) - Partial Differential Equations
Peter Dukes (University of Victoria) - Algebraic and Computational Methods in Combinatorics
Henry Fowler (Navajo Technical University) - Math Literacy and Advocating for Social Justice through Mathematics
Marc Frappier (Université de Sherbrooke) - formal specification methods in software engineering, specification, refinement, implementation, automatic code generation from formal specification, proof and model checking of properties, cybersecurity, intrusion detection, access control, vulnerability testing.
Nassif Ghoussoub (University of British Columbia) - Non-linear Analysis, Partial Differential Equations
Antonella Grassi (Universita di Bologna) - Algebraic Geometry and Applications to the Physics of String Theory
Michael Hrusak (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) - Set theory, Set-theoretic topology, Boolean Algebras
Chris Kapulkin (University of Western Ontario) - Homotopy Theory, (Higher) Category Theory, Homotopy Type Theory, Combinatorics, Formalization of Mathematics, Cryptography
Laks Lakshmanan (University of British Columbia) - Data Science and Statistics
Mark Lewis (University of Victoria) - Mathematical Biology
Jian-shu Li (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) - Representation theory and Automorphic forms
Vlada Limic (Université de Strasbourg) - Probability and Stochastic Processes
Alexander Litvak (University of Alberta) - Asymptotic Geometric Analysis, Functional Analysis, Convex Geometry, Discrete Geometry, Random Matrix Theory.
Richard Lockhart (Simon Fraser University) - I have worked a fair amount in the area of goodness-of-fit but have some experience in applications in the physical sciences, high dimensional inference, inference after model selection, probabilistic proofs in number theory, functional data analysis, copulas, inference for stochastic processes, and a variety of other things.
Jianfeng Lu (Duke University) - Applied Mathematics, Machine Learning
Anotida Madzwamuse (University of British Columbia) - Theoretical and Computational Biology, and Numerical Analysis
Karen Meagher (University of Regina) - Discrete Mathematics and Algebraic Graph Theory
Saman Muthukumarana (University of Manitoba) - Bayesian Methods, Biostatistics Data Science, Environmental and Ecological Statistics, Computational Statistics, Statistics in Sports
Janos Pach (Alfred Renyi Institute of Mathematics)
Joaquín Pérez (University of Granada) - Geometric analysis, with special emphasis in variational problems of geometric type: minimal and constant mean curvature surfaces, isoperimetric problem, and others(Topology, classification, group theory, combinatorics, real and complex analysis, Mathematical Analysis and Functional Analysis)
Malabika Pramanik (UBC) - Harmonic Analysis
Ajay Ramadoss (Indiana University) - Problems related to noncommutative geometry and its relation with other fields such as differential geometry; algebraic geometry; representation theory
Jacqui Ramagge (Durham University) - Group Theory, Functional Analysis, Operator Algebras, Control Theory, and Statistical Analyses of Learning Outcomes
Talia Ringer (UIUC) - Proof engineering, proof automation, proof assistants, dependent type theory, programming languages, AI for theorem proving
Yongbin Ruan (Zhejiang University) - Geometry and Topology
Miguel Sanchez Caja (University of Granada) - Differential Geometry, Variational methods, Mathematical Physics, Lorentzian Geometry
Barry Sanders (University of Calgary) - Quantum Algorithms and Implementations of Quantum Information Tasks
Samir Siksek (University of Warwick) - Computational Number Theory and Diophantine Equations
Ronnie Sircar (Princeton University) - Financial Mathematics, stochastic volatility models, energy markets and exhaustible resources, credit risk, asymptotic and computational methods, portfolio optimization and stochastic control problems, and stochastic differential games
Frank Sottile (Texas A&M University) - Algebraic Combinatorics and the Applications of Algebraic Geometry
Gabriella Tarantello (Roma Tor Vergata) - Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, Differential Geometry, Mathematical Physics Calculus of Variations and Gauge Field Theory
Aaron Tikuisis (University of Ottawa) - Structure of C*-algebras
Paul Tupper (Simon Fraser University) - Mathematical Modelling in Linguistics and Psychology
Chelsea Walton (Rice University) - Noncommutative Algebra, including quantum symmetries, algebras with origins in physics, noncommutative invariant theory, deformation theory, representation theory, and homological methods
Juncheng Wei (University of British Columbia) - Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, Applied, Nonlinear and Geometric Analysis, Mathematical Biology
Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University) - Number Theory & Arithmetic Algebraic Geometry

Bio sketches


Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University)

Louigi Addario-Berry received his Ph.D. from McGill University in 2006 under the supervision of Bruce Reed. He was Marie Curie Fellow at University of Oxford and Professeur Adjoint at Université de Montréal, before joining the faculty at McGill University in 2009. His principle research area is probability theory and its connections with combinatorics, statistics, statistical mechanics and theoretical computer science. In 2016 he was awarded the Coxeter-James Prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society, and in 2019 he was elected Fellow of the Canadian Mathematical Society. In 2020 he was elected Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, cited for "fundamental contributions to probability, in particular to the topics of branching structures and random graphs, and for his devoted service to the mathematical sciences and promotion of diversity within them."

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Ana Aguilera (University of Granada)

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David Ayala (Montana State University)

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Martin Barlow (University of British Columbia)

Martin Barlow received his doctoral degree from the University of Wales in 1979, and has held appointments at the University of Cambridge and the University of British Columbia. He is now Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at UBC. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Royal Society (London), and gave an invited talk at the 1990 International Congress of Mathematicians. He has received the Jeffery-Williams prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society, and the CRM-Fields-PIMS research prize of the Canadian Mathematical Institutes. His research is in probability theory, and in particular the study of diffusion and random walks in various types of irregular media.

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Yuri Berest (Cornell University)

Yuri Berest obtained his B.Sc. (1993) and M.Sc. in Mathematical Physics (1994) from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and his Ph.D. in Mathematics (1997) from the Université de Montréal. After spending two years as a Ch. B. Morrey assistant professor at the University of California in Berkeley, he moved to Cornell University, where he is currently full professor at the Department of Mathematics. He held long-term visiting professorships at IHES (France), Oxford University (All Souls College), MSRI (Berkeley) and ETH (Zurich). He was awarded the CMS Doctoral Prize (1998), Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (2001-2003) and Simons Fellowship in Mathematics (2019). His research interests include representation theory, algebraic geometry, homological algebra, and mathematical physics. Some of his recent work is related to derived algebraic geometry, and applications of homotopy-theoretic methods in representation theory and geometry.

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Derek Bingham (Simon Fraser University)

Derek Bingham is a Professor of Statistics and Actuarial Science at Simon Fraser University. He completed his PhD in Statistics in 1999 with Randy Sitter at SFU on the design and analysis of fractional factorial split-plot experiments. After graduating, he moved to the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan as an Assistant Professor. In 2003, he joined the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science at Simon Fraser as the Canada Research Chair in Industrial Statistics.

The focus of his current research is developing statistical methods for combining physical observations with large-scale computer simulators. This includes new methodology for Bayesian computer model calibration, emulation, uncertainty quantification and experimental design. His work is generally motivated by real-world applications. His recent collaborations have been with scientists at USA national laboratories (Argonne National Lab and Los Alamos National Lab) and also USA Department of Energy sponsored projects (Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics; Center for Exascale Radiation Transport).

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Steven Boyer (Université du Québec à Montréal)

Steven Boyer is a Professor of Mathematics at the Université du Québec à Montréal. His undergraduate studies were at the University of New Brunswick and graduate work at Cornell University, where he obtained a Ph. D. in Mathematics in 1983. After two years as an NSERC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge, he worked in the Mathematics Department of the University of Toronto before moving to UQAM in 1987. He has held visiting positions in Dijon, Geneva, Grenoble, Marseille, Rennes, Toulouse, the Institut Henri PoincaréŽ, and the Isaac Newton Institute, and has served on the editorial boards of the Canadian Journal of Mathematics, the Canadian Mathematics Bulletin, the Annales Mathématiques Blaise Pascal. Currently he is a member of the editorial boards of Algebraic and Geometric Topology and the Annales des sciences mathématiques du Québec. He is also the director of CIRGET, the Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherches en Géométrie et Topologie. His research area is the topology and geometry of low-dimensional manifolds.

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José A. Cañizo (Universidad de Granada)

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Jose Carrillo (University of Oxford)

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Peter Dukes (University of Victoria)

Peter Dukes is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Victoria. He obtained his PhD in 2003 from the California Institute of Technology, and then joined UVic after postdocs at Arizona State University and the University of Toronto. Peter's mathematical interests are centred on combinatorial structures, such as designs, codes, arrays, finite geometries, graphs and hypergraphs. His favorite problems often have algebraic or extremal themes. Peter was the recipient of the 2007 Kirkman Medal and 2014 Hall Medal in Combinatorics.

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Henry Fowler (Navajo Technical University)

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Marc Frappier (Université de Sherbrooke)

Marc Frappier is a professor of software engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Sherbrooke. Holding a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Ottawa, his research interests focus on the formal specification, synthesis, and construction of software and its application to security and model-based testing. He has published more than 130 papers in international journals and conferences, and co-edited two books. Before joining the University of Sherbrooke, he has worked for over five years in industry, as a consultant, senior analyst, and project manager for several companies. His industrial and research activities lead him to work in various domains: manufacturing (Alcan et Cascades), banking (Royal Bank of Canada, National Bank of Canada, BFD/ÆBIS), pharmaceutical (Merck Frosst), aerospace (Canadian Space Agency) and telecommunications (Nortel). He is the first recipient of the Distinguished Service Award of CS-Can | Info-Can, the association which represents the Canadian academic computer science community.

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Nassif Ghoussoub (University of British Columbia)

Nassif Ghoussoub obtained his Doctorat d'état in 1979 from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France and is currently a Professor of Mathematics and a Distinguished University Scholar at the University of British Columbia. His present research interests are in non-linear analysis and partial differential equations. He was the recipient of the Coxeter-James prize in 1990, and of a Killam senior fellowship in 1992. In 2004, he was awarded a Doctorat Honoris Causa by the Université Paris-Dauphine, and in 2015, he was named Doctor of Science Honoris Causa by the University of Victoria. The Canadian Mathematical Society awarded him the Jeffrey Williams Prize in 2007, and the David Borwein Distinguished Career Award in 2010. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1993, and was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada in December 2015.

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Antonella Grassi (Universita di Bologna)

Antonella Grassi is Full Professor at the University of Bologna, Italy, and Professor Emerita of Mathematics (with secondary appointment in Physics) at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Ph. D. from Duke University. She is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society and a 2018-2019 Simons Fellow in Mathematics. She was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study and the Mathematical Science Research Institute (she also co-organized the 2019 Special Program on Derived Geometry and Moduli Spaces).

Antonella Grassi's research interests are in algebraic geometry and applications to the physics of string theory.

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Michael Hrusak (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)

Michael Hrusak is a Mexican mathematician of Czech origin. He obtained his Master’s in 1994 from the Charles University in Prague and PhD in 1999 from York University in Toronto. Since 2002 he works as a full-time researcher at the National University of Mexico (UNAM). His research involves set theory and its applications to topology, mathematical analysis and geometry.

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Chris Kapulkin (University of Western Ontario)

Chris Kapulkin is an associate professor of mathematics at the University of Western Ontario. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Pittsburgh in 2014, under the supervision of Thomas C. Hales. He has held appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley, CA.

Kapulkin is best known for his work in homotopy type theory and higher category theory, in particular, settling the conjectures of Joyal (2014) and Voeovdsky (2019), but he has also published in combinatorics, formalization of mathematics, cryptography, and philosophy of mathematics. For his contributions, he received the Distinguished Research Professorship in Science in 2022.

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Laks Lakshmanan (University of British Columbia)

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Mark Lewis (University of Victoria)

Dr. Mark Lewis is a faculty member at the University of Alberta where he is the Senior Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Biology and directs the Centre for Mathematical Biology. He obtained his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1990 in mathematical biology. He was a faculty member at the University of Utah until 2001, and has also held visiting and research fellowships at Princeton University and Imperial College, University of London. He is Past President of the Society for Mathematical Biology, and is on the editorial boards for a number of journals including Journal of Mathematical Biology, IMA Journal of Mathematic Medicine and Biology, Ecology and Ecological Monographs. Lewis has served on a number of advisory boards, including and the Journal of Theoretical Biology Advisory Board and Scientific Advisory Board for the Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery. His research has been recognized by a Sloan Research Fellowship and a National Young Investigator Award (US NSF. Lewis’ research is in mathematical biology and ecology, including modeling and analysis of nonlinear PDE and integral models in population dynamics and ecology. Applications, made to case studies with detailed data and biology, include: wolf territories, elk migration in Yellowstone Park, spatial spread and impact of introduced pest species, vegetation shift in response to climate change and recolonization of Mt. St. Helens. He has also been a member of the PIMS Board of Directors since 2004.

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Jian-shu Li (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

Jian-shu Li is the current President of the Hong Kong Mathematical Society. Li was born in Xiaoshan, Zhejiang, China. He studied mathematics at the Department of Mathematics at Zhejiang University, and later obtained his Ph.D. in mathematics from Yale University. Before moving to Hong Kong, Li was a professor at the University of Maryland, College Park and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Li is a Professor of Mathematics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He is also a researcher at the Center of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, as well as a guest professor and doctoral advisor at Zhejiang University's Department of Mathematics.

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Vlada Limic (Université de Strasbourg)

Prof. Vlada Limic is originally from Zagreb, Croatia where she completed undergraduate studies in mathematics. From 1994 to 98 conducted PhD studies at UC Berkeley. Followed NSF postdoctoral fellowship at UC San Diego and at Cornell. From 2002-2007 a junior faculty at UBC. From 2006-2012 worked as independent researcher at CNRS, in Marseilles, France. In 2012 promoted to a research director of 2nd class within CNRS and moved to Orsay, Paris 11. In 2017 moved to University of Strasbourg. Major recognition: A.P. Sloan fellowship 2005, Alexander von Humboldt Bessel Research Award 2016.

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Alexander Litvak (University of Alberta)

Alexander Litvak got his diploma (an analog of MSc degree) from Saint Petersburg State University, Russia, and his PhD from Tel Aviv University, Israel under the supervision of E.D. Gluskin and V.D. Milman. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alberta and a Lady Davis postdoctoral fellow at the Technion, Haifa, Israel. He joined the University of Alberta as a faculty member in 2001. In 2010 Alexander was awarded the Faculty of Science Research Award by the University of Alberta and the next year he was awarded the E.W.R Steacie Memorial Fellowship by NSERC.

Alexander works in Asymptotic Geometric Analysis, which lies at the border between geometry and analysis stemming from the study of geometric properties of high-dimensional normed spaces, especially the characteristic behavior that emerges when the dimension (or a number of other relevant free parameters) is suitably large or tends to infinity. Because high-dimensional phenomena impact many disciplines, the Asymptotic Geometric Analysis is seen as the cross-roads of many branches of mathematics including Functional Analysis, Convex and Discrete Geometry, Random Matrix Theory, and several areas of Probability and Statistics.

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Richard Lockhart (Simon Fraser University)

I was born in Montreal, and grew up in Winnipeg and Tsawwassen (a Vancouver suburb). I am a mathematical statistician with an undergraduate degree in mathematics from the University of British Columbia (1975). I have a PhD in Statistics from the University of California at Berkeley (1979). I have been a faculty at Simon Fraser University since 1979. I have experience on a number of grant review committees (two terms with NSERC, one on the scientific advisory committee for the CRM, and currently on an FRQ review committee) as well as experience on advisory committees (Statistics Canada and an ASA committee to advise the US Energy Information Administration). I was once President of the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC) and Editor of the SSC news letter (Liaison). I have also had a fair amount of editorial experience (AE for The Canadian Journal of Statistics and Technometrics, Editor of The Canadian Journal of Statistics, one of 4 current co-editors for Statistics Surveys, and Executive Editor for the Journal of Multivariate Analysis).

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Jianfeng Lu (Duke University)

Jianfeng Lu is a Professor of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry at Duke University. Before joining Duke University, he obtained his PhD in Applied Mathematics from Princeton University in 2009 and was a Courant Instructor at New York University from 2009 to 2012. He works on mathematical analysis and algorithm development for problems and challenges arising from computational physics, theoretical chemistry, materials science, high-dimensional PDEs, and machine learning. His work has been recognized by a Sloan Fellowship, a NSF Career Award, and the 2017 IMA Prize in Mathematics and its Applications.

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Anotida Madzwamuse (University of British Columbia)

Anotida Madzvamuse holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Theoretical and Computational Biology at The University of British Columbia and is a full Professor in the Mathematics Department within the Faculty of Science since October 2022. Before, that he was Full Professor of Mathematical and Computational Biology in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Sussex, where he has been a faculty member since August 2006. He is a DPhil holder in Mathematics awarded by the University of Oxford in 2000. He is a former receipt of the Royal Society Research Merit Award (2016-2021), and was awarded the Theodor von Kaman Fellowship (2016) by RWTH University of Aachen in Germany. Madzvamuse has supervised and mentored more than 25 early career fellows (PhDs and PDRAs) as well as mentoring young early faculty members in the UK, mainland Europe, Africa, South America, North America and Asia. He is an advocate and ambassador for Mathematical Sciences in general and Mathematical and Computational Biology in particular. He was the Principal Organiser of the 6-months research programme at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (Cambridge, UK) in 2015 on Coupling Geometric PDEs with Physics for Cell Morphology, Motility and Pattern Formation. He continues to work closely with Learned Societies such as the London Mathematical Society (LMS) (on MARM in Africa), the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Society and International Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Edinburgh, Scotland. Currently, he is a Board Member of the BIRS Scientific and Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Boards, the INI Gateway Scientific Advisory Panel and the LMS Committee for Women and Diversity in Mathematics. Madzvamuse is fully committed to implementing good practice in creating a modern and inclusive research environment. He has supervised, mentored and trained early career fellows from diverse economic and social backgrounds including researchers from underrepresented minority groups, including female early career fellows and junior faculty members.

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Karen Meagher (University of Regina)

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Saman Muthukumarana (University of Manitoba)

Saman Muthukumarana obtained his B.Sc. honours special degree in Statistics (2002) from the University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka and then M.Sc. in Statistics (2007) and PhD in Statistics (2010) from Simon Fraser University. He joined the Department of Statistics at the University of Manitoba as an Assistant Professor in July 2010 where he was promoted to Associate Professor (with tenure) in 2016 and then to full Professor in 2022. He is the founding Director of Data Science Nexus at the University of Manitoba and he was appointed as the Head of the Department of Statistics at the University of Manitoba starting from July 2023. His research interests lie broadly in Bayesian methods and computation for complex models which integrate both theoretical and computational aspects. Along with this main theme, he has developed methods to facilitate modelling and inference on non-standard complex data which lead to innovative analyses of data arising from environment and ecology, fisheries, fresh and marine water animal movements, health, infectious diseases, assessing noninferiority in drug developments, user behaviour, social networks and sports. EDI Statement: We are moving towards a data rich digital world and open AI continues to evolve and integrate into our daily lives. The STEM fields have a bigger role to embrace this new era and I strongly believe that creating equal opportunities for everyone and removing systematic barriers, which prevent accessing the opportunities are crucial for fostering novel collaborations within and between STEM fields in this new era. It’s time to act on EDI principles to actively address inequalities and actively seek the value in diversity.

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Janos Pach (Alfred Renyi Institute of Mathematics)

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Joaquín Pérez (University of Granada)

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Malabika Pramanik (UBC)

Malabika Pramanik is a Canadian mathematician who works as a professor of mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Her research lies in mathematical analysis, specifically in the areas of harmonic analysis, geometric measure theory, complex variables, and partial differential equations. Her work focuses on exploring finer structures in mathematical ensembles involving sets and functions, in particular on fractals. One recurrent theme in her work is the search for patterns in seemingly random objects and their connections with quantifiable properties of these objects, such as regularity, clustering, smoothness or existence of arithmetic-geometric structures. Malabika received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley (2001). After short-term positions at the University of Wisconsin and Caltech she joined UBC in 2006. She is the 2015-16 winner of the Ruth I. Michler Prize of the Association for Women in Mathematics, the 2016 Krieger-Nelson Prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society (CMS) and a Killam Research Prize (2017) from the UBC Faculty of Science. In her role as Vice-President for the Pacific region of the CMS and as organizer of ongoing programs such as "Two weeks in Vancouver - a summer school for undergraduate women in math" and "Diversity in mathematics", she is actively engaged in initiatives that promote representation of women and minority groups in STEM fields.

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Ajay Ramadoss (Indiana University)

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Jacqui Ramagge (Durham University)

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Talia Ringer (UIUC)

Talia Ringer is an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Their main interest is in making program verification using interactive theorem provers more accessible through better proof engineering tools and practices, especially when it comes to maintaining proofs as programs change over time. Their vision is a future of verification that is accessible to all programmers, not just to experts. They got their Ph.D. from University of Washington in June 2021. Prior to graduate school, they earned their bachelor’s in mathematics and computer science from University of Maryland, then worked at Amazon as a software engineer for three years. They are the founder and previous chair of the SIGPLAN-M international long-term mentoring program, the founder and president of the Computing Connections Fellowship, and a contributor to the Coq interactive theorem prover. They helped organize the National Academies workshop on AI to Assist Mathematical Reasoning. They also organize online communities for neurodivergent researchers in computer science. They were awarded the ACM SIGPLAN Distinguished Service Award in 2023.

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Yongbin Ruan (Zhejiang University)

Yongbin Ruan is a Chinese mathematician who deals with algebraic geometry, differential geometry and symplectic geometry with applications in string theory. Ruan studied from 1978 at Sichuan University with a degree in 1985. 1985/86 he was teaching assistant at the University of Wisconsin. He received his doctorate in 1991 from Robinson Kirby (and Tomasz Mrowka) at the University of California, Berkeley ( Gauge theory and its applications to Riemannian Geometry ). As a post-doctoral student, he was at Michigan State University. In 1993 he became Assistant Professor at the University of Utah, 1995 Associate Professor and 1999 Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since 2006 he is a professor at the University of Michigan.

He has been a visiting professor at ETH Zurich, Hong Kong and MIT. In 1993 and 2004 he was at the IHES , 1993 at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics, 1994 at the Isaac Newton Institute and 1994 at the MSRI. In 1998 he was Invited Speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Berlin ( Quantum Cohomology and its Applications ). From 1995 to 1997 he was a Sloan Research Fellow. He is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

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Miguel Sanchez Caja (University of Granada)

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Barry Sanders (University of Calgary)

Dr. Barry Sanders is a Professor and Director of the Institute for Quantum Science and Technology at the University of Calgary, a Thousand Talents Chair at the University of Science and Technology China and a Vajra Visiting Faculty member of the Raman Research Institute in India. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Calgary and his PhD at Imperial College London. His postdoctoral research was at the Australian National University, the University of Queensland and the University of Waikato. Dr. Sanders was on the Macquarie University faculty from 1991 until moving to Calgary in 2003.

Dr. Sanders is especially well known for seminal contributions to theories of quantum-limited measurement, highly nonclassical light, practical quantum cryptography and optical implementations of quantum information tasks. His current research interests include quantum algorithms and implementations of quantum information tasks. Dr. Sanders is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (U.K.), the Optical Society of America, the Australian Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society and the Royal Society of Canada. In 2016 Sanders was awarded the Imperial College London Doctor of Science (DSc) degree, and he is Editor-in-Chief of New Journal of Physics.

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Samir Siksek (University of Warwick)

Samir Siksek obtained his B.A. from Oxford, and his PhD from Exeter. He is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick, and a past holder of an EPSRC Leadership Fellowship. His research focuses on rational points on curves, and the resolution of explicit Diophantine problems.

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Ronnie Sircar (Princeton University)

RONNIE SIRCAR is a Professor of Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) at Princeton University, and is affiliated with the Bendheim Center for Finance, the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. He received his doctorate from Stanford University, and taught for three years at the University of Michigan in the Department of Mathematics. He has received continuing National Science Foundation research grants since 1998. He was a recipient of the E-Council Excellence in Teaching Award for his teaching in 2002, 2005 and 2006, and the Howard B. Wentz Jr. Junior Faculty Award in 2003. His research interests center on Financial Mathematics, stochastic volatility models, energy markets and exhaustible resources, credit risk, asymptotic and computational methods, portfolio optimization and stochastic control problems, and stochastic differential games. He is a co-author of the book “Multiscale Stochastic Volatility for Equity, Interest-Rate and Credit Derivatives”, published by Cambridge University Press in 2011, and was founding co-editor-in-chief of the SIAM Journal on Financial Mathematics, from 2009-2015. He was Director of Graduate Studies for the Master in Finance program at the Bendheim Center for Finance from 2015-2018. He is the current Chair of the ORFE department. He was made a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2020 for “contributions to financial mathematics and asymptotic methods for stochastic control and differential games.”

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Frank Sottile (Texas A&M University)

Dr. Sottile is a Professor of Mathematics at Texas A&M University since 2004. He holds a Masters degree from Cambridge University (1986) and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1994). He has had appointments at the Universities of Toronto, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts, and the MSRI. He was the founding chair of the SIAM Activity group on Algebraic geometry and is a corresponding editor of the SIAM Journal on Applied Algebra and Geometry. He was a Churchill Scholar, held an NSF Career award, and is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society. His research interests are in algebraic combinatorics and the applications of algebraic geometry, including computational and real algebraic geometry.

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Gabriella Tarantello (Roma Tor Vergata)

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Aaron Tikuisis (University of Ottawa)

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Paul Tupper (Simon Fraser University)

Paul Tupper is Professor of Mathematics and Director of Cognitive Science at Simon Fraser University. He received his PhD in Scientific Computing-Computational Mathematics from Stanford in 2002, was an NSERC postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Physics of Materials at McGill University from 2002 to 2004, and was then an Assistant Professor of Mathematics at McGill for the next few years. He has been at SFU since 2008, and he was a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Applied Mathematics from 2008 to 2019. His research focuses on problems in metric geometry motivated by phylogenetics as well as mathematical modelling in linguistics and cognitive psychology.

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Chelsea Walton (Rice University)

Chelsea Walton is a faculty member in the Mathematics Department at Rice University in Houston. She earned her PhD in 2011 at the University of Michigan, and spent a significant amount of time completing her thesis work at the University of Manchester (UK). She has held postdoctoral positions at the University of Washington in Seattle, at SLMSI (formerly known as MSRI) in Berkeley, and at MIT in Boston. She was a faculty member at Temple University in Philadelphia and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before joining Rice in 2020.

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Juncheng Wei (University of British Columbia)

Juncheng Wei received his doctoral degree from the University of Minnesota in 1994, and has held appointments at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (until 2013) and the University of British Columbia. He is now Canada Research Chair Professor (Tier I) at UBC. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and gave an invited talk at the 2014 International Congress of Mathematicians. He was awarded the Croucher Senior Fellowship of Croucher Foundation (2005), the Morningside Medal in Mathematics of the Chinese Congress of Mathematicians (2010), the Jeffery-Williams prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society (2020), and Simons Fellowship in Mathematics (2020). His research is in nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications in differential geometry, physical fluids, mathematical biology and applied physics.

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Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University)

Shou-Wu Zhang is a Chinese-American mathematician known for his work in number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry. He is currently a Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University. He was admitted to the Sun Yat-sen University chemistry department in 1980; he later transferred to the mathematics department of the same institution. He received his bachelor's degree in 1983. After Zhang received his master's degree from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1986, he studied under Lucien Szpiro and Gerd Faltings at Columbia University and Princeton University, completing his PhD in 1991. He was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study and an assistant professor at Princeton University from 1991 to 1996. Zhang has been tenured at Columbia University since 1996 and at Princeton University since 2011.

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