Current Members of the Scientific Advisory Board

Nassif Ghoussoub (Chair) (University of British Columbia) - Non-linear Analysis, Partial Differential Equations
Kai Behrend (University of British Columbia) - Algebraic Geometry
Jerry Bona (University of Illinois at Chicago) - Fluid Mechanics and Partial Differential Equations
Andrei Bulatov (Simon Fraser University) - Theoretical Computer Science
Krzysztof Burdzy (University of Washington) - Stochastic Analysis, related problems in Potential Theory and Partial Differential Equations, and Foundations of Probability Theory
Mónica Clapp (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) - Nonlinear Analysis and Partial Differential Equations
Luc Devroye (McGill University) - Computer science and Probability Theory
Andrew Eckford (York University) - Information Theory and Signal Processing
Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California) - Group theory
Viqar Husain (University of New Brunswick) - Theoretical Physics -- General Relativity and Quantum Gravity
Svetlana Katok (The Pennsylvania State University) - Dynamical Systems
Matilde Lalin (Université de Montrèal) - Number Theory
Kristin Lauter (Microsoft Research) - Number theory
Randy LeVeque (University of Washington) - Scientific computing and partial differential equations
Ayelet Lindenstrauss (Indiana University) - Algebraic Topology, Homological Algebra, and Algebraic K-Theory
Peter McCullagh (University of Chicago) - Statistical theory and Applications
Alex Mogilner (New York University) - Mathematical Biology, Cell Biology and Biophysics
Irena Peeva (Cornell University) - Commutative Algebra
Daniel Pollack (University of Washington) - Differential geometry
James Ramsay (McGill University) - Statistics
Nancy Reid (University of Toronto) - Statistics
Gordon Semenoff (University of British Columbia) - Particle & Nuclear Physics, Theoretical Physics
Benny Sudakov (ETH) - Combinatorics
Dan Voiculescu (University of California, Berkeley)
Mary F. Wheeler (University of Texas at Austin)
Daniel Wise (McGill University) - Geometric Group Theory and 3-manifolds

Bio sketches


Nassif Ghoussoub (Chair) (University of British Columbia)

Nassif Ghoussoub obtained his Doctorat d'état in 1979 from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France and is currently a Professor of Mathematics and a Distinguished University Scholar at the University of British Columbia. His present research interests are in non-linear analysis, optimization and partial differential equations. He was the recipient of the Coxeter-James prize in 1990, of a Killam senior fellowship in 1992 and has been a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada since 1993. In 2004, he was awarded a Doctorat Honoris Causa by the Université Paris-Dauphine. The Canadian Mathematical Society awarded him the Jeffrey Williams Prize in 2007, and the David Borwein Distinguished Career Award in 2010.

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Kai Behrend (University of British Columbia)

Kai Behrend received his PhD from the University of California in Berkeley in 1991. He held postdoctoral positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Max-Planck-Institute in Bonn, before joining the faculty of the University of British Columbia in 1995. He held visiting positions at RIMS (Kyoto), MSRI (Berkeley), the Fields Institute (Toronto), Imperial College (London), and Oxford University. He received the Coxeter-James and the Jeffery-Williams prizes of the Canadian Mathematical Society, the PIMS-Fields-CRM research prize, and was invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Seoul, 2014. Kai Behrend’s research is in Algebraic Geometry, specifically moduli spaces. He as made foundational contributions to both Gromov-Witten theory and Donaldson-Thomas theory.

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Jerry Bona (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Jerry Bona received his Ph.D. under the guidance of Garret Birkhoff in 1971. He was a post-doc with Brooke Benjamin at the University of Essex in 1970-72 before joining the department of mathematics at the University of Chicago as an L.E. Dickson instructor. He rose through the ranks, becoming Professor there in 1979. He moved to Penn State to set up a fluid mechanics laboratory in their mathematics department. Later, he joined the mathematics department and the Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin. He is currently professor of mathematics in the Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Bona's research is mainly in fluid mechanics and partial differential equations, but he has also written in oceanography, coastal engineering, numerical analysis, economic theory and biology.

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Andrei Bulatov (Simon Fraser University)

Andrei Bulatov received his PhD from Ural State University in 1995. He held various faculty positions at the same university and a research position at the University of Oxford. Currently, he is now a Professor at the School of Computing Science of Simon Fraser University. His research interests include algorithms, computational complexity, constraint satisfaction problem, and applications of universal algebra. He and his students have received best paper awards at computer science conferences. He will be an ICM speaker at Seoul in 2014.

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Krzysztof Burdzy (University of Washington)

Krzysztof Burdzy received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1984. He joined the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1988, where he is currently a professor of mathematics and adjunct professor of statistics. He received the Rollo Davidson Prize in 1992 and the Carver Medal of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in 2016. His research interests include stochastic analysis, related problems in potential theory and partial differential equations, and foundations of probability theory.

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Mónica Clapp (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)

Mónica Clapp obtained her PhD in 1979 in algebraic topology from the University of Heidelberg. Her present research interests are in nonlinear analysis and partial differential equations, with a particular emphasis on the study of variational nonlinear problems using geometric and topological methods. She is full professor at the Institute of Mathematics of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, where she has worked since 1979. Mónica Clapp is a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. She was the recipient of the Juana Ramírez de Asbaje Distinction, granted by UNAM, in 2003, and has been honored with the appointments of National Researcher level 3 of the Mexican National Researcher System, and Fellow of the American Mathematical Society inaugural class 2013.

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Luc Devroye (McGill University)

Luc Devroye obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Texas in 1976, and joined the faculty of McGill University in 1977. He is the recipient of and E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship (1987), a Humboldt Research Award (2004), the Killam Prize (2005), and the Statistical Society of Canada Gold Medal (2008). His research interests include probability theory as applied to the analysis of algorithms, mathematical statistics, machine learning, pattern recognition, and random number generation.

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Andrew Eckford (York University)

Andrew Eckford is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at York University, Toronto, Ontario. He received the B.Eng. degree from the Royal Military College of Canada in 1996, and the M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Toronto in 1999 and 2004, respectively, all in Electrical Engineering. Andrew held postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Toronto, prior to taking up a faculty position at York in 2006. Andrew’s research interests include the application of information theory to nonconventional channels and systems, especially the use of molecular and biological means to communicate. Andrew's research has been covered in media including The Economist and The Wall Street Journal, and was a finalist for the 2014 Bell Labs Prize. Andrew is also a co-author of the textbook Molecular Communication, published by Cambridge University Press.

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Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California)

Robert Guralnick received his Ph. D. from UCLA in 1977 and is currently a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Southern California. His research interests include linear and permutation representations of finite and algebraic groups with applications to number theory and algebraic geometry. He will be an ICM speaker at Seoul in 2014, a PIMS distinguished lecturer and a plenary speaker at the British Colloquium. He gave a plenary talk at the annual AMS meeting in 2013. He was the G. C. Steward fellow at Gonville and Caius in Cambridge in 2009 and has held visiting appointments at Yale, Caltech, Princeton, Cambridge, IAS, the Newton Institute and MSRI. He was an inaugural Simons Foundation Fellow in 2013 (spending the year at Princeton and IAS).

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Viqar Husain (University of New Brunswick)

Viqar Husain is a Professor of Applied Mathematics in the University of New Brunswick. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Manchester and his PhD in Theoretical Physics from Yale University (1989). His research interests span classical and quantum aspects of gravity. He is known for work on self-dual gravity, exact solutions to Einstein's equations, and non-perturbative approaches to quantum gravity. He is an APS Outstanding Referee (2008) and received the First Award of the Gravity Research Foundation in 1999. He served as Scientific Director of the Atlantic Association for Research in the Mathematical Sciences (2008-2011), and presently serves on its Board.

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Svetlana Katok (The Pennsylvania State University)

Svetlana Katok grew up in Moscow, and earned a masters degree from Moscow State University in 1969. She emigrated to the USA in 1978 and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1983 under the supervision of Don Zagier. She was awarded an NSF postdoctoral fellowship and was associated with Caltech and four campuses of the University of California before moving to Penn State in 1990, where she was promoted to full professor in 1993. Her mathematical interests center on the interaction between number theory, geometry and dynamical systems with the latter field, her first mathematical specialty, coming to the fore in the last decade. She serves as managing editor of Journal of Modern Dynamics and Electronic Research Announcements in Mathematical Sciences. She has served on many AMS, NSF and NRC committees and panels and was a Member-at-Large of the AMS Council for 1993-1996. In 2001 she received the Eberly College of Science Alumni Society Distinguished Service Award at Penn State. She was the 2004 Emmy Noether Lecturer of the Association for Women in Mathematics. In 2012 she became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

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Matilde Lalin (Université de Montrèal)

Matilde Lalin is an associate professor at the Université de Montréal. She received her PhD in 2005 from the University of Texas at Austin where she was a Harrington Fellow. She was a member at the Institute for Advanced Study, a Clay Liftoff Fellow, a PIMS postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia, and an Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta before moving to her present institution. In addition, she held visiting positions at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, the Institut des hautes études scientifiques, and the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics. Her research interests lie in Number Theory and related areas and they include Mahler measure, special values of L-functions, and arithmetic statistics. She has written more than 25 articles in these topics.

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Kristin Lauter (Microsoft Research)

Kristin Lauter is a Principal Researcher, Research Manager of the Cryptography Research Group at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, and an Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on number theory and algebraic geometry, with applications to cryptography and coding theory. Lauter received her BA, MS, and PhD degrees in mathematics from the University of Chicago, in 1990, 1991, and 1996, respectively. Prior to joining Microsoft Research, she held positions as T.H. Hildebrandt Research Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan (1996-1999), a Visiting Scholar at Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in Bonn, Germany (1997), and a Visiting Researcher at the Institut de Mathématiques Luminy in France (1999). From 2010-2013 she was a member of the Senior Leadership Team for the Microsoft Research XCG Lab. Lauter has published extensively in mathematics and computer science, with over 50 published research articles and 3 edited volumes. In 2008, Lauter, together with her coauthors, was awarded the Selfridge Prize in Computational Number Theory. Her research has been covered in scientific publications such as Science, American Scientist, and Technology Review. Lauter has given an Invited Address at the SIAM Annual Meeting and Invited Addresses at regional meetings of the AMS and MAA. She has served on the Executive Committee of the Association for Women in Mathematics and on the editorial boards for Journal of Algebra and Its Applications and International Journal of Information and Coding Theory. She has served as Program Chair and on the Program Committee for many cryptography conferences in computer science, and she serves on the Advisory Board for SHARPS, the Strategic Healthcare IT Advanced Research Projects on Security.

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Randy LeVeque (University of Washington)

Randy LeVeque received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1982. He has been in the Applied Mathematics Department at UW since 1985 and has also held positions at the Courant Institute (NYU), UCLA, and ETH-Zurich. He is a Fellow of SIAM of the AMS, and is currently Chair of the SIAM Journals Committee. He received a Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1987 and was an invited speaker at ICM 2006 in Madrid. LeVeque's main research interests are in the development, analysis, and application of numerical methods for partial differential equations. He is the primary developer of the Clawpack software package and the author of three books on numerical methods for differential equations.

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Ayelet Lindenstrauss (Indiana University)

Ayelet Lindenstrauss did her undergraduate studies at the Hebrew University and got her Ph.D. in 1992 from Princeton University. She held postdoctoral positions in the University of Pennsylvania and at the Technion and spent a year at the University of Missouri before coming to Indiana University, where she is now a Professor of Mathematics. She was a Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in 2007 and a Research Professor at MSRI in 2014. She is an algebraic topologist, particularly interested in trace-type approximations of algebraic K-theory.

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Peter McCullagh (University of Chicago)

Peter grew up in Northern Ireland. Before moving to Chicago, he obtained his Bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Birmingham, and his doctoral degree in statistics from Imperial College. He has held visiting positions at the University of British Columbia and at Bell Labs. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Royal Society. Peter's research focuses on probabilistic modelling, statistical theory, and the application of statistical methods in diverse areas, particularly in scientific research such as biostatistics, agricultural research, ecology and animal behaviour. Recent probabilistic work includes boson point processes, exchangeability and random discrete structures such as random partitions, Gibbs random trees, random graphs and so on. Recent statistical work has focused on health monitoring and survival processes. Peter is the author of two books, Tensor Methods in Statistics, and Generalized Linear Models, with co-author John Nelder. He has served as editor of the journal Bernoulli, and as an associate editor of Biometrika, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, and the Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics.

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Alex Mogilner (New York University)

Alex Mogilner received his PhD in Mathematics in 1995 from the University of British Columbia. He then was a postdoctoral fellow in Biology at the University of California at Berkeley, and from 1996 to 2014 worked at the University of California at Davis. Alex is a Professor of Mathematics and Biology at the Courant Institute and Department of Biology, New York University. Alex served on editorial boards of many journals including Cell, Biophysical Journal, Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, Molecular Biology of the Cell, and was a panel chair at NIH. His research interests are in Mathematical Biology, Cell Biology and Biophysics; he does research on mathematical and computational modeling of cell motility and cell division, and experimental research on galvanotaxis.

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Irena Peeva (Cornell University)

Irena Peeva obtained her Ph.D. in 1995 from Brandeis University under the guidance of David Eisenbud. After holding a C.L.E. Moore Instructorship at M.I.T., she joined the faculty of Cornell University in 1998. Her research interests are in Commutative Algebra and its connections to Algebraic Geometry, Combinatorics, Computational Algebra, Subspace Arrangements, and Noncommutative Algebra, with special emphasis on Free Resolutions, Hilbert Schemes and Hilbert Functions. She is the author of the book Graded Syzygies, published by Springer. Peeva was invited to deliver a Plenary Address at the National Meeting of the AMS (generally known as the Joint Mathematics Meeting) in 2015 and a Plenary Address at the CMS Summer Meeting in 2013. She received a Sloan Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship (1994/1995), C.L.E. Moore Instructorship at M.I.T. (1995-1998), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (1999-2001), NSF CAREER Grant (2004-2009), Simons Foundation Fellowship (2012/2013), and is an AMS Fellow since 2013.

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Daniel Pollack (University of Washington)

Daniel Pollack received his BS and MS from the University of Pennsylvania in 1986 and his PhD from Stanford University in 1991. After post-doctoral positions at the University of Texas Austin and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute he spent two years as an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago before moving to the University of Washington in 1996 where he is currently a Professor of Mathematics. His research interests include problems at the interface of differential geometry and partial differential equations. For the last ten years the focus of his work has been centered on mathematical problems in general relativity, and he is a co-author (along with Piotr Chrusciel and Gregory Galloway) of a major survey of the field which appeared in the Bulletin of the AMS in 2010. He has held visiting appointments at IAS, Brown, MIT, MSRI, the Newton Institute and Institute Mittag-Leffler. His research is currently supported by the Simons Foundation.

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James Ramsay (McGill University)

Jim Ramsay is a Professor Emeritus of Psychology and an Associate Member in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at McGill University. He received a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1966 in quantitative psychology. He served as chair of the Department from 1986-1989. Jim has contributed research on various topics in psychometrics, including multidimensional scaling and test theory. His current research focus is on functional data analysis, and involves developing methods for analyzing samples of curves and images. The identification of systems of differential equations from noisy data plays an important role in this work. He has been President of the Psychometric Society and the Statistical Society of Canada. He received the Gold Medal of the Statistical Society of Canada in 1998 and the Award for Technical or Scientific Contributions to the Field of Educational Measurement of the U. S. National Council on Measurement in Education in 2003, and was made an Honorary Member of the Statistical Society of Canada in 2012.

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Nancy Reid (University of Toronto)

Nancy Reid is University Professor of Statistics at the University of Toronto. She received her Bachelor of Mathematics in 1974 from the University of Waterloo, her MSc in 1976 from the University of British Columbia, and her Ph.D. in 1979 from Stanford University. She held an academic appointment at the University of British Columbia from 1980-1986 and has held visiting appointments at Imperial College, London, Harvard University and the University of Texas at Austin. She is a former vice-president of the International Statistical Institute, and a former President of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, a recipient of the Presidents' Award of the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies, the first recipient of the Canadian Mathematical Society's Krieger-Nelson Prize Lectureship, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics' Wald lecturer for 2000. Her research interests include inferential statistics with special emphasis on asymptotic theory for likelihood based inference, design of experiments, and applications of statistics to health and environment.

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Gordon Semenoff (University of British Columbia)

Gordon Semenoff is a theoretical physicist and is Professor of Physics at the University of British Columbia. His research spans a wide range of theoretical subjects from condensed matter physics to string theory. He was awarded the CAP/CRM Prize in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics year 2000 and the Brockhouse Medal for Achievement in Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science in 2010. He was also awarded the Canadian Association of Physicists Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics in 2011. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and an Officer of the Order of Canada. Gordon received his Ph.D. from the University of Alberta in 1981, was a postdoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and joined the faculty of the University of British Columbia in 1983. He has held visiting professorships at numerous institutions worldwide including the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, the Henri Poincare Institute in Paris and the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques in Bures-Sur-Yvette. Gordon has achieved international recognition for his 1984 pioneering work on the substance which later became known as graphene. His highly cited work which predated the discovery of graphene in the laboratory by 20 years was important for understanding that material and its remarkable electronic properties which have generated considerable excitement in fields spanning condensed matter physics, material science and electronics technology. Gordon is well known for contributions to quantum field theory, in particular for using mathematical index theorems to understand fractional charges and the discovery of the parity anomaly of odd-dimensional gauge theories. These ideas have had significant influence over the years and have recently come to the forefront in studies of topological insulators. His pioneering work on the real-time formulation of relativistic quantum field theories at non-zero temperature and density, including invention of the “Kobes-Semenoff rules”, are considered cornerstones of that subject. He has made important contributions to string theory. His computation of the Wilson loop in N = 4 Yang Mills theory is considered a classic and an important test of a duality between gauge fields and strings. His pioneering work in 2002 on string loop corrections to plane wave strings is considered seminal, not just for its results, but as the beginning of the integrability program of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory which has been widely pursued over the ten years since.

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Benny Sudakov (ETH)

Benny Sudakov got his Ph.D from Tel Aviv University in 1999, had appointments in Princeton University and Institute for Advanced Studies and is currently professor of mathematics in ETH, Zurich and UCLA. He is the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award and was invited speaker at 2010 International Congress of Mathematicians. His main research interests are Combinatorics and its applications to other areas of mathematics and computer science.

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Dan Voiculescu (University of California, Berkeley)

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Mary F. Wheeler (University of Texas at Austin)

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Daniel Wise (McGill University)

Dani Wise grew up in NY and received his BA from Yeshiva in 1991 and PhD from Princeton in 1996. After postdocs and visiting positions at Berkeley, Cornell, and Brandeis, he moved to McGill in 2001, where he is currently James McGill Professor. His primary research agenda has been to explore and promulgate the utility and ubiquity of nonpositively curved cubical geometry in group theory and topology. He received the Oswald Veblen prize in 2013, became a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2014, spoke at the ICM in 2014, was Poincare Chair at the IHP in 2015, and received the CRM-Fields-PIMS Prize in 2016.

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