Current Members of the Scientific Advisory Board

Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University) - Probability, Combinatorics, Mathematical Statistics, Theoretical Computer Science, Statistical Physics
Ana Aguilera (University of Granada) - Modelling and forecasting with functional data, Categorical data analysis, Statistical applications in different fields
Martin Barlow (University of British Columbia) - Probability Theory
Yuri Berest (Cornell University) - Representation Theory and Geometry
Derek Bingham (Simon Fraser University) - Statistics
Steven Boyer (Université du Québec à Montréal) - Fundamental Mathematics & Topology of varieties.
W. John Braun (University of British Columbia -- Okanagan) - Statistics and data science
José Alfredo Cañizo (Universidad de Granada) - Partial Differential Equations
Jose Carrillo (University of Oxford) - Partial Differential Equations
Caroline Colijn (Simon Fraser University) - Mathematics and the Epidemiology and Evolution of Pathogens
Anne Condon (University of British Columbia) - Computational Complexity Theory and Design of Algorithms
Weinan E (Princeton University) - Machine Learning
Marc Frappier (Université de Sherbrooke) - formal specification methods in software engineering, specification, refinement, implementation, automatic code generation from formal specification, proof and model checking of properties, cybersecurity, intrusion detection, access control, vulnerability testing.
Nassif Ghoussoub (University of British Columbia) - Non-linear Analysis, Partial Differential Equations
Antonella Grassi (Università di Bologna) - Algebraic Geometry and Applications to the Physics of String Theory
Achim Kempf (U of Waterloo Canada) - Quantum gravity, Cosmology, Relativistic quantum Information, Shannon sampling theory, Data compression, Mathematical Biology
Matthew Kennedy (University of Waterloo) - Non-Commutative Function Theory, Operator Algebras
Laks Lakshmanan (University of British Columbia) - Data Science and Statistics
Mark Lewis (University of Alberta) - Mathematical Biology
Jian-shu Li (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) - Representation theory and Automorphic forms
Vlada Limic (Université de Strasbourg) - Probability and Stochastic Processes
Alexander Litvak (University of Alberta) - Asymptotic Geometric Analysis, Functional Analysis, Convex Geometry, Discrete Geometry, Random Matrix Theory.
Marta Mazzocco (University of Birmingham) - Integrable Systems, Mathematical Physics
Karen Meagher (University of Regina) - Discrete Mathematics and Algebraic Graph Theory
Luis Montejano (UNAM) - Topology, Geometry
Janos Pach (NYU Courant and Renyi Institute of Mathematics, Budapest)
Joaquín Pérez (University of Granada) - Geometric analysis, with special emphasis in variational problems of geometric type: minimal and constant mean curvature surfaces, isoperimetric problem, and others(Topology, classification, group theory, combinatorics, real and complex analysis, Mathematical Analysis and Functional Analysis)
Lillian Pierce (Duke University) - Analytic Number Theory and Harmonic Analysis. Member of BIRS SAB, 2020-2022.
David Pike (Memorial University of Newfoundland) - Combinatorial Design Theory, Graph Theory, and Combinatorial Computing
Malabika Pramanik (University of British Columbia) - Harmonic Analysis
Jacqui Ramagge (Durham University) - Group Theory, Functional Analysis, Operator Algebras, Control Theory, and Statistical Analyses of Learning Outcomes
Yongbin Ruan (Zhejiang University) - Geometry and Topology
Miguel Sanchez Caja (University of Granada) - Differential Geometry, Variational methods, Mathematical Physics, Lorentzian Geometry
Barry Sanders (University of Calgary) - Quantum Algorithms and Implementations of Quantum Information Tasks
Samir Siksek (University of Warwick) - Computational Number Theory and Diophantine Equations
Ronnie Sircar (Princeton University) - Financial Mathematics, stochastic volatility models, energy markets and exhaustible resources, credit risk, asymptotic and computational methods, portfolio optimization and stochastic control problems, and stochastic differential games
Frank Sottile (Texas A & M University) - Algebraic Combinatorics and the Applications of Algebraic Geometry
Katherine Stange (University of Colorado, Boulder) - Number Theory, Geometry, Cryptography
Gabriella Tarantello (Roma Tor Vergata) - Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, Differential Geometry, Mathematical Physics Calculus of Variations and Gauge Field Theory
Paul Tupper (Simon Fraser University) - Mathematical Modelling in Linguistics and Psychology
Matthew Valeriote (McMaster University) - Mathematical Logic, Universal Algebra, Model Theory, Computational Complexity
Juncheng Wei (University of British Columbia) - Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, Applied, Nonlinear and Geometric Analysis, Mathematical Biology
Ben Williams (University of British Columbia) - Algebraic Topology
Allan Willms (University of Guelph) - Mathematical Biology, Dynamical Systems, Bifurcation Theory, Scientific Computing, and Climate Change Modelling
Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University) - Number Theory & Arithmetic Algebraic Geometry

Bio sketches


Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University)

Louigi Addario-Berry received his Ph.D. from McGill University in 2006 under the supervision of Bruce Reed. He was Marie Curie Fellow at University of Oxford and Professeur Adjoint at Université de Montréal, before joining the faculty at McGill University in 2009. His principle research area is probability theory and its connections with combinatorics, statistics, statistical mechanics and theoretical computer science. In 2016 he was awarded the Coxeter-James Prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society, and in 2019 he was elected Fellow of the Canadian Mathematical Society. In 2020 he was elected Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, cited for "fundamental contributions to probability, in particular to the topics of branching structures and random graphs, and for his devoted service to the mathematical sciences and promotion of diversity within them."

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Ana Aguilera (University of Granada)

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Martin Barlow (University of British Columbia)

Martin Barlow received his doctoral degree from the University of Wales in 1979, and has held appointments at the University of Cambridge and the University of British Columbia. He is now Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at UBC. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Royal Society (London), and gave an invited talk at the 1990 International Congress of Mathematicians. He has received the Jeffery-Williams prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society, and the CRM-Fields-PIMS research prize of the Canadian Mathematical Institutes. His research is in probability theory, and in particular the study of diffusion and random walks in various types of irregular media.

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Yuri Berest (Cornell University)

Yuri Berest obtained his B.Sc. (1993) and M.Sc. in Mathematical Physics (1994) from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and his Ph.D. in Mathematics (1997) from the Université de Montréal. After spending two years as a Ch. B. Morrey assistant professor at the University of California in Berkeley, he moved to Cornell University, where he is currently full professor at the Department of Mathematics. He held long-term visiting professorships at IHES (France), Oxford University (All Souls College), MSRI (Berkeley) and ETH (Zurich). He was awarded the CMS Doctoral Prize (1998), Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (2001-2003) and Simons Fellowship in Mathematics (2019). His research interests include representation theory, algebraic geometry, homological algebra, and mathematical physics. Some of his recent work is related to derived algebraic geometry, and applications of homotopy-theoretic methods in representation theory and geometry.

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Derek Bingham (Simon Fraser University)

Derek Bingham is a Professor of Statistics and Actuarial Science at Simon Fraser University. He completed his PhD in Statistics in 1999 with Randy Sitter at SFU on the design and analysis of fractional factorial split-plot experiments. After graduating, he moved to the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan as an Assistant Professor. In 2003, he joined the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science at Simon Fraser as the Canada Research Chair in Industrial Statistics.

The focus of his current research is developing statistical methods for combining physical observations with large-scale computer simulators. This includes new methodology for Bayesian computer model calibration, emulation, uncertainty quantification and experimental design. His work is generally motivated by real-world applications. His recent collaborations have been with scientists at USA national laboratories (Argonne National Lab and Los Alamos National Lab) and also USA Department of Energy sponsored projects (Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics; Center for Exascale Radiation Transport).

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Steven Boyer (Université du Québec à Montréal)

Steven Boyer is a Professor of Mathematics at the Université du Québec à Montréal. His undergraduate studies were at the University of New Brunswick and graduate work at Cornell University, where he obtained a Ph. D. in Mathematics in 1983. After two years as an NSERC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge, he worked in the Mathematics Department of the University of Toronto before moving to UQAM in 1987. He has held visiting positions in Dijon, Geneva, Grenoble, Marseille, Rennes, Toulouse, the Institut Henri PoincaréŽ, and the Isaac Newton Institute, and has served on the editorial boards of the Canadian Journal of Mathematics, the Canadian Mathematics Bulletin, the Annales Mathématiques Blaise Pascal. Currently he is a member of the editorial boards of Algebraic and Geometric Topology and the Annales des sciences mathématiques du Québec. He is also the director of CIRGET, the Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherches en Géométrie et Topologie. His research area is the topology and geometry of low-dimensional manifolds.

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W. John Braun (University of British Columbia -- Okanagan)

W. John Braun is Professor and Head of Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics and Statistics at UBC's Okanagan campus. He received his Ph.D. in Statistics from the University of Western Ontario in 1992. He served as Deputy Director of the Canadian Statistical Sciences Institute from 2015 to 2020. His research is motivated by scientific problems coming from psychology, biology, medicine, engineering and physics. His methodological contributions are primarily focussed on smoothing techniques for noisy data.

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José Alfredo Cañizo (Universidad de Granada)

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Jose Carrillo (University of Oxford)

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Caroline Colijn (Simon Fraser University)

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Anne Condon (University of British Columbia)

Anne Condon is a professor of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1987 and her B.Sc. from University College Cork, Ireland in 1982. She is interested in computational complexity theory and design of algorithms. Over the years, the problems she has worked on come from many areas, including bioinformatics, hardware verification, and combinatorial auctions. Much of her current work focuses on models (such as Chemical Reaction Networks) and algorithms for computing with molecules, as well as methods for predicting DNA kinetics.

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Weinan E (Princeton University)

Weinan E is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University. He got his Ph.D. from UCLA in 1989 and afterwards held visiting positions at NYU and the Institute for Advanced Study. He was on the faculty of the Courant Institute from 1994 to 1999 before moving to Princeton.

Weinan E’s main research interest is numerical algorithms, machine learning and multi-scale modeling, with applications to chemistry, material sciences and fluid mechanics. In recent years, he has also developed an interest in control theory.

Weinan E was awarded the ICIAM Collatz Prize in 2003, the SIAM Kleinman Prize in 2009 and the SIAM von Karman Prize in 2014, the SIAM-ETH Peter Henrici Prize in 2019, and the ACM Gordon-Bell Prize in 2020. He is a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and a fellow of SIAM, AMS and IOP. Weinan E has been an invited speaker at ICM, ICIAM as well as the AMS National Meeting. He has also been an invited speaker at APS, ACS, AIChe annual meetings and the American Conference of Theoretical Chemistry.

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Marc Frappier (Université de Sherbrooke)

Marc Frappier is a professor of software engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Sherbrooke. Holding a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Ottawa, his research interests focus on the formal specification, synthesis, and construction of software and its application to security and model-based testing. He has published more than 130 papers in international journals and conferences, and co-edited two books. Before joining the University of Sherbrooke, he has worked for over five years in industry, as a consultant, senior analyst, and project manager for several companies. His industrial and research activities lead him to work in various domains: manufacturing (Alcan et Cascades), banking (Royal Bank of Canada, National Bank of Canada, BFD/ÆBIS), pharmaceutical (Merck Frosst), aerospace (Canadian Space Agency) and telecommunications (Nortel). He is the first recipient of the Distinguished Service Award of CS-Can | Info-Can, the association which represents the Canadian academic computer science community.

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Nassif Ghoussoub (University of British Columbia)

Nassif Ghoussoub obtained his Doctorat d'état in 1979 from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France and is currently a Professor of Mathematics and a Distinguished University Scholar at the University of British Columbia. His present research interests are in non-linear analysis and partial differential equations. He was the recipient of the Coxeter-James prize in 1990, and of a Killam senior fellowship in 1992. In 2004, he was awarded a Doctorat Honoris Causa by the Université Paris-Dauphine, and in 2015, he was named Doctor of Science Honoris Causa by the University of Victoria. The Canadian Mathematical Society awarded him the Jeffrey Williams Prize in 2007, and the David Borwein Distinguished Career Award in 2010. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1993, and was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada in December 2015.

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Antonella Grassi (Università di Bologna)

Antonella Grassi is Full Professor at the University of Bologna, Italy, and Professor Emerita of Mathematics (with secondary appointment in Physics) at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Ph. D. from Duke University. She is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society and a 2018-2019 Simons Fellow in Mathematics. She was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study and the Mathematical Science Research Institute (she also co-organized the 2019 Special Program on Derived Geometry and Moduli Spaces).

Antonella Grassi's research interests are in algebraic geometry and applications to the physics of string theory.

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Achim Kempf (U of Waterloo Canada)

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Matthew Kennedy (University of Waterloo)

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Laks Lakshmanan (University of British Columbia)

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Mark Lewis (University of Alberta)

Dr. Mark Lewis is a faculty member at the University of Alberta where he is the Senior Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Biology and directs the Centre for Mathematical Biology. He obtained his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1990 in mathematical biology. He was a faculty member at the University of Utah until 2001, and has also held visiting and research fellowships at Princeton University and Imperial College, University of London. He is Past President of the Society for Mathematical Biology, and is on the editorial boards for a number of journals including Journal of Mathematical Biology, IMA Journal of Mathematic Medicine and Biology, Ecology and Ecological Monographs. Lewis has served on a number of advisory boards, including and the Journal of Theoretical Biology Advisory Board and Scientific Advisory Board for the Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery. His research has been recognized by a Sloan Research Fellowship and a National Young Investigator Award (US NSF. Lewis’ research is in mathematical biology and ecology, including modeling and analysis of nonlinear PDE and integral models in population dynamics and ecology. Applications, made to case studies with detailed data and biology, include: wolf territories, elk migration in Yellowstone Park, spatial spread and impact of introduced pest species, vegetation shift in response to climate change and recolonization of Mt. St. Helens. He has also been a member of the PIMS Board of Directors since 2004.

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Jian-shu Li (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

Jian-shu Li is the current President of the Hong Kong Mathematical Society. Li was born in Xiaoshan, Zhejiang, China. He studied mathematics at the Department of Mathematics at Zhejiang University, and later obtained his Ph.D. in mathematics from Yale University. Before moving to Hong Kong, Li was a professor at the University of Maryland, College Park and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Li is a Professor of Mathematics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He is also a researcher at the Center of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, as well as a guest professor and doctoral advisor at Zhejiang University's Department of Mathematics.

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Vlada Limic (Université de Strasbourg)

Prof. Vlada Limic is originally from Zagreb, Croatia where she completed undergraduate studies in mathematics. From 1994 to 98 conducted PhD studies at UC Berkeley. Followed NSF postdoctoral fellowship at UC San Diego and at Cornell. From 2002-2007 a junior faculty at UBC. From 2006-2012 worked as independent researcher at CNRS, in Marseilles, France. In 2012 promoted to a research director of 2nd class within CNRS and moved to Orsay, Paris 11. In 2017 moved to University of Strasbourg. Major recognition: A.P. Sloan fellowship 2005, Alexander von Humboldt Bessel Research Award 2016.

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Alexander Litvak (University of Alberta)

Alexander Litvak got his diploma (an analog of MSc degree) from Saint Petersburg State University, Russia, and his PhD from Tel Aviv University, Israel under the supervision of E.D. Gluskin and V.D. Milman. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alberta and a Lady Davis postdoctoral fellow at the Technion, Haifa, Israel. He joined the University of Alberta as a faculty member in 2001. In 2010 Alexander was awarded the Faculty of Science Research Award by the University of Alberta and the next year he was awarded the E.W.R Steacie Memorial Fellowship by NSERC.

Alexander works in Asymptotic Geometric Analysis, which lies at the border between geometry and analysis stemming from the study of geometric properties of high-dimensional normed spaces, especially the characteristic behavior that emerges when the dimension (or a number of other relevant free parameters) is suitably large or tends to infinity. Because high-dimensional phenomena impact many disciplines, the Asymptotic Geometric Analysis is seen as the cross-roads of many branches of mathematics including Functional Analysis, Convex and Discrete Geometry, Random Matrix Theory, and several areas of Probability and Statistics.

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Marta Mazzocco (University of Birmingham)

Professor Mazzocco is a specialist in the area of integrable systems, namely mathematical problems often motivated by Mathematical Physics that present unexpected beauty - a serendipity of geometric/algebraic/analytical structures that make a very complicated problem solvable in some sense. Her research brings geometry, quantum algebra and analysis together to describe and tackle problems which have so far resisted all other methods. Professor Mazzocco has an outstanding record in attracting external funding. In 2003, she obtained an EPSRC First Grant while still on a temporary job; according to the EPSRC administrators, this is very rare, if not the unique case they know of. In 2006, she was awarded an EPSRC Advanced Research Fellowship for 5 years, then in 2008, 2011, 2017 three further major EPSRC research grants. Professor Mazzocco is a keen advocate of the importance of basic research and its role in society. She believes that in the current funding landscape that emphasises socio-economic impact, it is paramount to nurture interdisciplinary research as well as to raise the profile of the unique contribution that basic research (and in particular Mathematical Sciences) brings to the overall research base, the economy and society - this has driven her to become a member of the Council of the European Mathematical Society; of the Institute of Mathematics and Applications Research Committee; and of the London Mathematical Society Nominating Committee. Professor Mazzocco is also a passionate in promoting Equality and Diversity initiatives both within her own University and internationally. In her previous position at Loughborough University she has successfully led my department to win an Athena SWAN silver award (one of only 5 mathematics departments in the UK to have achieved this), and has acted as director of Equality and Diversity for the School of Science.

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Karen Meagher (University of Regina)

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Luis Montejano (UNAM)

Luis Montejano is Professor at the National University of México, Campus-Juriquilla and was Head of the Institute of Mathematics of the same university, 1994-1998. He received his Ph.D. from Utah University in 1979 and was Member of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Princeton, N.J., E.U.A., 1980-1981. He received the Alexander von Humboldt Scholarship at the University of Heidelberg 1989-1990 and also received the Prize of the Russian Academy of Science, Steklov Institute, Topology, 2001. His research is related with applications of algebraic topology to discrete and convex geometry.

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Janos Pach (NYU Courant and Renyi Institute of Mathematics, Budapest)

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Joaquín Pérez (University of Granada)

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Lillian Pierce (Duke University)

Lillian Pierce is the Nicholas J. and Theresa M. Leonardy Professor of Mathematics at Duke University. She received her PhD from Princeton in 2009, with advisor Elias M. Stein. Subsequently she was a Member and NSF postdoc at the IAS, a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Oxford, and a Bonn Junior Fellow at the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics in Bonn. As a young faculty member, Pierce was awarded an NSF CAREER award, a Sloan Research Fellowship, the Joan and Joseph Birman Fellowship, the AWM-Sadosky Research Prize, and the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE). She has been a von Neumann Fellow at the IAS and a Bonn Research Fellow. Pierce holds editorial positions including at the Journal of the AMS, Transactions of the AMS, Memoirs of the AMS, Journal of Geometric Analysis, and Annals of Math. Studies. Pierce is committed to enhancing the mathematics we do, and the way we do it, by deepening the inclusiveness of the mathematics community.

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David Pike (Memorial University of Newfoundland)

David Pike received a BMath degree in 1992 from the University of Waterloo and a PhD in 1996 from Auburn University. In 1998 he joined the faculty at Memorial University of Newfoundland where he is currently a University Research Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics (with a cross-appointment to the Department of Computer Science). His research involves combinatorial design theory and graph theory. Recent work has been on such topics as colourings of combinatorial designs and graph decompositions, configuration orderings, as well as graph-based games.

He was awarded the Hall Medal of the Institute of Combinatorics and its Applications in 2007. He has served on NSERC panels for grants and scholarships and was Vice-President (Atlantic) of the Canadian Mathematical Society (2015-2017). Currently he is on editorial boards for the Australasian Journal of Combinatorics and the Journal of Combinatorial Designs. Since 2016 he has been a Vice-President of the Institute of Combinatorics and its Applications.

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Malabika Pramanik (University of British Columbia)

Malabika Pramanik is a Canadian mathematician who works as a professor of mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Her research lies in mathematical analysis, specifically in the areas of harmonic analysis, geometric measure theory, complex variables, and partial differential equations. Her work focuses on exploring finer structures in mathematical ensembles involving sets and functions, in particular on fractals. One recurrent theme in her work is the search for patterns in seemingly random objects and their connections with quantifiable properties of these objects, such as regularity, clustering, smoothness or existence of arithmetic-geometric structures. Malabika received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley (2001). After short-term positions at the University of Wisconsin and Caltech she joined UBC in 2006. She is the 2015-16 winner of the Ruth I. Michler Prize of the Association for Women in Mathematics, the 2016 Krieger-Nelson Prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society (CMS) and a Killam Research Prize (2017) from the UBC Faculty of Science. In her role as Vice-President for the Pacific region of the CMS and as organizer of ongoing programs such as "Two weeks in Vancouver - a summer school for undergraduate women in math" and "Diversity in mathematics", she is actively engaged in initiatives that promote representation of women and minority groups in STEM fields.

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Jacqui Ramagge (Durham University)

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Yongbin Ruan (Zhejiang University)

Yongbin Ruan is a Chinese mathematician who deals with algebraic geometry, differential geometry and symplectic geometry with applications in string theory. Ruan studied from 1978 at Sichuan University with a degree in 1985. 1985/86 he was teaching assistant at the University of Wisconsin. He received his doctorate in 1991 from Robinson Kirby (and Tomasz Mrowka) at the University of California, Berkeley ( Gauge theory and its applications to Riemannian Geometry ). As a post-doctoral student, he was at Michigan State University. In 1993 he became Assistant Professor at the University of Utah, 1995 Associate Professor and 1999 Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since 2006 he is a professor at the University of Michigan.

He has been a visiting professor at ETH Zurich, Hong Kong and MIT. In 1993 and 2004 he was at the IHES , 1993 at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics, 1994 at the Isaac Newton Institute and 1994 at the MSRI. In 1998 he was Invited Speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Berlin ( Quantum Cohomology and its Applications ). From 1995 to 1997 he was a Sloan Research Fellow. He is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

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Miguel Sanchez Caja (University of Granada)

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Barry Sanders (University of Calgary)

Dr. Barry Sanders is a Professor and Director of the Institute for Quantum Science and Technology at the University of Calgary, a Thousand Talents Chair at the University of Science and Technology China and a Vajra Visiting Faculty member of the Raman Research Institute in India. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Calgary and his PhD at Imperial College London. His postdoctoral research was at the Australian National University, the University of Queensland and the University of Waikato. Dr. Sanders was on the Macquarie University faculty from 1991 until moving to Calgary in 2003.

Dr. Sanders is especially well known for seminal contributions to theories of quantum-limited measurement, highly nonclassical light, practical quantum cryptography and optical implementations of quantum information tasks. His current research interests include quantum algorithms and implementations of quantum information tasks. Dr. Sanders is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (U.K.), the Optical Society of America, the Australian Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society and the Royal Society of Canada. In 2016 Sanders was awarded the Imperial College London Doctor of Science (DSc) degree, and he is Editor-in-Chief of New Journal of Physics.

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Samir Siksek (University of Warwick)

Samir Siksek obtained his B.A. from Oxford, and his PhD from Exeter. He is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick, and a past holder of an EPSRC Leadership Fellowship. His research focuses on rational points on curves, and the resolution of explicit Diophantine problems.

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Ronnie Sircar (Princeton University)

RONNIE SIRCAR is a Professor of Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) at Princeton University, and is affiliated with the Bendheim Center for Finance, the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. He received his doctorate from Stanford University, and taught for three years at the University of Michigan in the Department of Mathematics. He has received continuing National Science Foundation research grants since 1998. He was a recipient of the E-Council Excellence in Teaching Award for his teaching in 2002, 2005 and 2006, and the Howard B. Wentz Jr. Junior Faculty Award in 2003. His research interests center on Financial Mathematics, stochastic volatility models, energy markets and exhaustible resources, credit risk, asymptotic and computational methods, portfolio optimization and stochastic control problems, and stochastic differential games. He is a co-author of the book “Multiscale Stochastic Volatility for Equity, Interest-Rate and Credit Derivatives”, published by Cambridge University Press in 2011, and was founding co-editor-in-chief of the SIAM Journal on Financial Mathematics, from 2009-2015. He was Director of Graduate Studies for the Master in Finance program at the Bendheim Center for Finance from 2015-2018. He is the current Chair of the ORFE department. He was made a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2020 for “contributions to financial mathematics and asymptotic methods for stochastic control and differential games.”

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Frank Sottile (Texas A & M University)

Dr. Sottile is a Professor of Mathematics at Texas A&M University since 2004. He holds a Masters degree from Cambridge University (1986) and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1994). He has had appointments at the Universities of Toronto, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts, and the MSRI. He was the founding chair of the SIAM Activity group on Algebraic geometry and is a corresponding editor of the SIAM Journal on Applied Algebra and Geometry. He was a Churchill Scholar, held an NSF Career award, and is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society. His research interests are in algebraic combinatorics and the applications of algebraic geometry, including computational and real algebraic geometry.

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Katherine Stange (University of Colorado, Boulder)

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Gabriella Tarantello (Roma Tor Vergata)

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Paul Tupper (Simon Fraser University)

Paul Tupper is Professor of Mathematics and Director of Cognitive Science at Simon Fraser University. He received his PhD in Scientific Computing-Computational Mathematics from Stanford in 2002, was an NSERC postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Physics of Materials at McGill University from 2002 to 2004, and was then an Assistant Professor of Mathematics at McGill for the next few years. He has been at SFU since 2008, and he was a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Applied Mathematics from 2008 to 2019. His research focuses on problems in metric geometry motivated by phylogenetics as well as mathematical modelling in linguistics and cognitive psychology.

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Matthew Valeriote (McMaster University)

Matt Valeriote is a professor in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at McMaster University. He obtained a B.Math from the University of Waterloo in 1981 and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1986. He conducts research in mathematical logic, primarily focussed on the study of general algebraic structures and their applications to theoretical computer science.

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Juncheng Wei (University of British Columbia)

Juncheng Wei received his doctoral degree from the University of Minnesota in 1994, and has held appointments at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (until 2013) and the University of British Columbia. He is now Canada Research Chair Professor (Tier I) at UBC. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and gave an invited talk at the 2014 International Congress of Mathematicians. He was awarded the Croucher Senior Fellowship of Croucher Foundation (2005), the Morningside Medal in Mathematics of the Chinese Congress of Mathematicians (2010), the Jeffery-Williams prize of the Canadian Mathematical Society (2020), and Simons Fellowship in Mathematics (2020). His research is in nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications in differential geometry, physical fluids, mathematical biology and applied physics.

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Ben Williams (University of British Columbia)

Ben Williams is an Assistant Professor at UBC in Mathematics. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Stanford University in 2010 and his M.Sc. in Mathematics from University College Dublin in 2004. His research interests encompass the application of homotopy-theoretic methods to problems in, or inspired by, algebra and algebraic geometry.

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Allan Willms (University of Guelph)

Allan Willms is a professor of Mathematics at the University of Guelph. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University, Center for Applied Mathematics, in 1997 under the supervision of John Guckenheimer. He received an M.Math (1993) and B.Math (1992) from the University of Waterloo. Allan was a faculty member at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand for five years, and has been at Guelph since 2003. Allan's research covers a broad range of areas including mathematical biology, dynamical systems, bifurcation theory, scientific computing, and climate change modelling. He enjoys working with experimentalists, helping solve the problems in which they are interested.

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Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University)

Shou-Wu Zhang is a Chinese-American mathematician known for his work in number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry. He is currently a Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University. He was admitted to the Sun Yat-sen University chemistry department in 1980; he later transferred to the mathematics department of the same institution. He received his bachelor's degree in 1983. After Zhang received his master's degree from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1986, he studied under Lucien Szpiro and Gerd Faltings at Columbia University and Princeton University, completing his PhD in 1991. He was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study and an assistant professor at Princeton University from 1991 to 1996. Zhang has been tenured at Columbia University since 1996 and at Princeton University since 2011.

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