Computational and Numerical Analysis of Transient Problems in Acoustics, Elasticity, and Electromagnetism (16w5071)

Arriving in Banff, Alberta Sunday, January 17 and departing Friday January 22, 2016

Organizers

(University of Delaware)

(University of Tuebingen)

Description

The Banff International Research Station will host the "Computational and Numerical Analysis of Transient Problems in Acoustics, Elasticity, and Electromagnetism" workshop from January 17th to January 22nd, 2016.



When we hear or see, when our computer connects via WiFi to the network, when our cars are quiet or when we marvel at ultrasonic medical imaging, we are using or controlling electromagnetic, acoustic or elastic waves. In some applications we want to use waves to carry information, in some we want to use waves to probe inaccessible structures, and in some we want to control the amplitude of the vibrations. All these applications benefit from scientific computing tools that allow the simulation of wave propagation in complex media.

Underlying the scientific computing of wave propagation and interaction are special numerical and mathematical analysis techniques that help to make the computational algorithms faster and more reliable. This conference aims to bring together an international group of specialists in several aspects of computational wave propagation with the aim to exploit synergies between several types of recently developed methods and their mathematical analysis.




The Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery (BIRS) is a collaborative Canada-US-Mexico venture that provides
an environment for creative interaction as well as the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and methods within the Mathematical Sciences, with related disc
iplines and with industry. The research station is located at The Banff Centre in Alberta and is supported by Canada's Natural Science and Engineeri
ng Research Council (NSERC), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), Alberta's Advanced Education and Technology, and Mexico's Consejo Nacional
de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).