Modeling and Engineering of the Mammalian Embryo (20w5134)

Organizers

(University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

Janet Rossant (University of Toronto)

Eric Siggia (Rockefeller University)

Description

The Casa Matemática Oaxaca (CMO) will host the "Modeling and Engineering of the Mammalian Embryo" workshop in Oaxaca, from May 17 to May 22, 2020.


The mammalian embryo is a paradigm of regulative development and self-organization, making it a fascinating system for quantitative experimentation and analysis and mathematical modeling. Most of our current knowledge of mammalian embryology is derived from studies of the mouse embryo, leading to astonishing discoveries of self-organizing and emergent properties ("the laws of development") manifest during embryonic development. Importantly, recent advances in generating human embryo-like structures from human pluripotent stem cells and in vitro cultured human embryos have led to exciting new human-related embryological models that are promising for advancing human embryology. Thus, the aspiration for this BIRS workshop is to bring together world-leading embryologists, theoretical physicists, mathematicians and bioengineers, who share common interests in studying the laws of development, to tackle emerging open questions in the field of embryology. This BIRS workshop will help initiate new collaborations between the attendants, and such collaborative efforts will lead to novel integrative approaches that incorporates quantitative experimentation and analysis and mathematical models developed from formal mathematical or physical principles.


The Casa Matemática Oaxaca (CMO) in Mexico, and the Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery (BIRS) in Banff, are collaborative Canada-US-Mexico ventures that provide an environment for creative interaction as well as the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and methods within the Mathematical Sciences, with related disciplines and with industry. The research station in Banff is supported by Canada's Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), Alberta's Advanced Education and Technology, and Mexico's Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT). The research station in Oaxaca is funded by CONACYT